Weekly Live Stash Vol. XXXIV, October 28, 2022

Every Friday at 5 pm ET, nugs.net founder Brad Serling hosts “The Weekly Live Stash” on nugs.net radio, nugs.net radio – SiriusXM channel 716. Tune in to hear his selections of the best new live music, and check out this week’s playlist below featuring professionally mixed recordings from Pearl Jam, Eggy, Spafford, Gov’t Mule with John Popper and more. Subscribers can stream this week’s tracks from the #WeeklyLiveStash in the mobile app.

  1. Superblood Wolfmoon
    Pearl Jam
    9/20/22 Oklahoma City, OK
  2. That Black Bat Licorice
    Jack White
    9/30/22 Tucson, AZ
  3. Born On The Wrong Planet
    The String Cheese Incident
    10/31/96 Charlotte, NC
  4. Those Shoes
    Spafford
    10/25/22 Bend, OR
  5. Hunger Strike / Dear Mr. Fantasy / Hunger Strike
    Gov’t Mule (w/ John Popper)
    10/22/22 Ridgeland, MS
  6. Candyman
    Bobby Weir & Wolf Bros
    10/21/22 Eugene, OR
  7. Low Spark Of High Heeled Boys
    Steve Kimock and Friends
    10/6/22 Charlotte, NC
  8. All Wheels Turnin’
    Eggy
    10/15/22 Syracuse, NY
  9. Bear’s Gone Fishin’
    Widespread Panic
    10/22/22 Milwaukee, WI

Weekly Live Stash Vol. XXXII, October 14, 2022

Every Friday at 5 pm ET, nugs.net founder Brad Serling hosts “The Weekly Live Stash” on nugs.net radio, nugs.net radio – SiriusXM channel 716. Tune in to hear his selections of the best new live music, and check out this week’s playlist below featuring professionally mixed recordings from Eggy, Goose featuring Big Boi from OutKast, Billy Strings, Jack White and more. Subscribers can stream this week’s tracks from the #WeeklyLiveStash in the mobile app.

  1. BubaGum
    Eggy
    10/1/22 Pembroke, MA
  2. So Fresh, So Clean
    Goose (w/ Big Boi – Outkast)
    10/8/22 Austin, TX
  3. Freeborn Man
    Billy Strings
    10/6/22 Austin, TX
  4. I Told Them All About You
    Greensky Bluegrass (w/ Mollie Tuttle)
    10/9/22 Portland, ME
  5. Señor
    Gov’t Mule (w/ The Dirty Knobs)
    10/11/22 Durham, NC
  6. The Same Boy You’ve Always Known
    Jack White
    9/29/22 Sante Fe, NM
  7. Crown Of Thorns
    Pearl Jam
    9/11/22 New York, NY
  8. Anorexia
    Zero
    7/30/22 Eugene, OR
  9. Everything’s Right
    Trey Anastasio
    10/8/22 Berkeley,CA
  10. Turbulence & The Night Rays
    Goose
    10/11/22 Kansas City, MO

Weekly Live Stash, Vol. XXXI, October 7, 2022

Every Friday at 5 pm ET, nugs.net founder Brad Serling hosts “The Weekly Live Stash” on nugs.net radio, nugs.net radio – SiriusXM channel 716. Tune in to hear his selections of the best new live music, and check out this week’s playlist below featuring professionally mixed recordings from Widespread Panic, Goose, Steve Kimock and Friends, Jack White and more. Subscribers can stream this week’s tracks from the #WeeklyLiveStash in the mobile app.

  1. You Can’t Always Get What You Want
    Widespread Panic (w/ Chuck Leavell)
    10/1/22 Memphis, TN
  2. Tumble
    Goose
    10/1/22 Atlanta, GA
  3. I’ve Got You Surrounded (With My Love)
    Jack White
    9/17/22 Chattanooga, TN
  4. Away From The Mire
    Billy Strings
    9/30/22 Stanford, CA
  5. Better Git It In Your Soul
    Steve Kimock and Friends
    9/23/22 Kent, OH                             
  6. Terrapin Station Suite
    Bobby Weir & Wolf Bros
    9/30/22 Waterbury, CT
  7. Ghosts of the Forest
    Trey Anastasio
    9/30/22 Riverside,CA

Weekly Live Stash Vol. XXIX, September 23, 2022

Every Friday at 5 pm ET, nugs.net founder Brad Serling hosts “The Weekly Live Stash” on nugs.net radio, nugs.net radio – SiriusXM channel 716. Tune in to hear his selections of the best new live music, and check out this week’s playlist below featuring professionally mixed recordings from Billy Strings, Greensky Bluegrass (w/ Holly Bowling), Jack White, Widespread Panic, Gov’t Mule and more. Subscribers can stream this week’s tracks from the #WeeklyLiveStash in the mobile app.

  1. Turmoil and Tinfoil
    Billy Strings
    9/18/22 Saratoga Springs, NY
  2. Living Over
    Greensky Bluegrass (w/ Holly Bowling)
    9/17/22 Morrison, CO
  3. Waves
    BIG Something (w/ Kanika Moore – Doom Flamingo)
    8/5/22 Martinsville, VA
  4. Hungry Like The Wolf
    Eggy
    9/10/22 Oak Bluffs, MA
  5. Walkin’ (For Your Love)
    Widespread Panic
    9/17/22 Oxon Hill, MD
  6. Come And Go Blues
    Gov’t Mule
    9/20/22 Oklahoma City, OK
  7. Seven Nation Army
    Jack White
    9/15/22 Louisville, KY
  8. Jellyfish
    The String Cheese Incident
    9/17/22 Santa Cruz, CA

Edmonton 2007 Contains The Most Impressive Ten Song Run The White Stripes Ever Played

LISTEN NOW: Shaw Conference Center, Edmonton, AB – June 30, 2007

Exclusive to nugs.net, this month’s Third Man Thursday release brings us The White Stripes June 30, 2007 performance from Edmonton. From archivist Ben Blackwell:

Another entry from the ’07 Icky Thump tour, the middle of this set features a mind-bending run of short, quick song teases all in a row (“I Think I Smell A Rat” to “Cannon” to “Wasting My Time” to “Screwdriver”) which lands directly on top of a stellar “The Union Forever.” From there, the combo of “Cannon / John The Revelator” melts effortlessly into “Little Room” which jumpstarts immediately into a frenetic “Hotel Yorba,” all followed up with a take on “I’m Finding It Harder To Be A Gentleman” that turns on a dime when Jack substitutes the lyrics to “Now Mary” while still playing the tune to “Gentlemen.” Which then morphs into a unique “The Denial Twist.” All that to say, for my money this is the most impressive ten song run I ever saw the White Stripes do.

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Setlist

Dead Leaves And The Dirty Ground
Icky Thump
When I Hear My Name
I’m Slowly Turning Into You
Effect And Cause
I Think I Smell A Rat (tease)
Cannon (tease)
Wasting My Time (tease)
Screwdriver (tease)
The Union Forever
Cannon / John The Revelator
Little Room
Hotel Yorba
I’m Finding It Harder To Be A Gentleman / Now Mary (medley)
The Denial Twist
Catch Hell Blues
A Martyr For My Love For You
In The Cold, Cold Night
Black Math
Passive Manipulation
We’re Going To Be Friends
You Don’t Know What Love Is (You Just Do As You’re Told)

Encore
Astro
Jack The Ripper
The Big Three Killed My Baby
Little Ghost
The Same Boy You’ve Always Known
Jolene
Ball And Biscuit
Seven Nation Army
Boll Weevil

Weekly Live Stash Vol. XXIV, August 19, 2022

Every Friday at 5 pm ET, nugs.net founder Brad Serling hosts “The Weekly Live Stash” on nugs.net radio, SiriusXM channel 716. Tune in to hear his selections of the best new live music, and check out this week’s playlist below featuring soundboard recordings from Widespread Panic, Jack White’s European tour, Greensky Bluegrass and more.

  1. Bird Song
    Widespread Panic
    8/13/22 Atlanta, GA
  2. A Tip From You To Me
    Jack White
    7/20/22 Paris, France
  3. All Along The Way
    Jack White
    7/20/22 Paris, France
  4. Atlas Dogs
    Goose
    8/13/22 Columbia, MD
  5. Chest Fever
    Eggy
    8/5/22 Woodstock, NY
  6. Beautifully Broken / Breakdown / Beautifully Broken
    Gov’t Mule
    8/13/22 New Haven, CT
  7. Dancing in the Dark
    Greensky Bluegrass
    8/13/22 Seaside Heights, NJ
  8. Atlantic City
    Greensky Bluegrass
    8/13/22 Seaside Heights, NJ
  9. Fluffhead
    Phish
    8/13/22 East Troy, WI

Chasing Ghosts With The White Stripes At Sloss Furnaces

LISTEN NOW: Sloss Furnaces, Birmingham, AL – July 30, 2007

By Ben Blackwell

The fact that the word “penultimate” exists exclusively as an adjective for next-to-last situations feels almost egregious. I mean, did we really need an eleven letter word to describe this scenario when a three-word combination totaling ten letters does the job just perfectly?

Because let’s face it…second-to-last things are kinda just whatever. All the penumbra and history and tall tales sprout effortlessly from every last whisper about the LAST of something, the finality, the never-again crushing darkness of an abyss of nothingness for the rest of eternity. 

So for me to roll in and tell you just how good the White Stripes were in their penultimate live show…I understand the urge to call bullshit. But honestly, truthfully, with all personal bias removed from shading of opinion here…this show is phenomenal.

Visits to an Original House of Pancakes, a record store and some antique shops all replay as relatively ordinary for daytime activities. If anything, my memory of the day sticks out as being oppressively hot. With afternoon highs in the 90s, temps at Sloss Furnaces – the supposedly haunted turn-of-the-century pig iron producing blast furnace turned concert venue – would hover into the 80s well into the Stripes performance that night. Factor in the crush of 2400 bodies crammed into the rudimentary shed-like structure with unforgiving open air walls and my recall of the event is overwhelmingly punctuated by the feel, smell and general annoyance of sweat.

Add in the decrepit, rusted, tetanus-y surroundings of the rest of the campus and the knowledge that the number of workers who died there was rumored to be in the hundreds, their falling or being pushed into the red hot fires of the furnaces only to be instantly incinerated and the unshakable pall that casts on a spot even some five decades after the last flames there were extinguished…needless to say it didn’t feel like an ordinary show by any means.

Opener Dan Sartain would play in front of the biggest hometown crowd of his career and the highlight for me (playing drums for him on this leg) was his inquiry to the crowd “So…how many genuine Alabama rednecks we got here tonight?” After a strong response from the crowd, Dan replied “Well, you made my life a living hell for 26 years. Thank you.”

Just…perfect in every way.

The show kicks off with “Dead Leaves And The Dirty Ground” and finds Jack taking liberties (for the better) in a song where he usually did not. The particularly gnarly first note of feedback curves into some choice guitar syncopations. As the most-frequent set opener across the band’s career, it feels odd that this would be the last time the Stripes ever started a show with “Dead Leaves” as their final gig would begin with a cover “Stop Breaking Down.”

“Icky Thump” rolls into the fray wildly. To hear the assembled crowd, without prompting, perfectly nail the patter of twelve “la’s” sung in rapid succession at the end of the second verse, all mere weeks after the song’s release…it is a great reminder as to how WIDE this record reached so quickly upon deployment. 

Leading into “When I Hear My Name” Jack, particularly chatty this evening, says “Meg and I knew we was Alabama bound!” and despite any hammy undertones, it ultimately comes off as sincere and heartfelt. Leading out from there, “Hotel Yorba” hits as particularly vivacious, Meg’s accompanying vocals both vivid and spot-on. 

Jack’s unusual beginning to “The Denial Twist” and the improvised divergent lyrics in the second verse, which seem to say “It’s the way you rock and roll!” leave the Stripes’ final performance of this song as striking. 

While the extended, elegiac intro to “Death Letter” stands strongly as a haunting slice of slide guitar, Jack’s improvised lyrics on the third verse delight. Similar to his moves earlier in “Dead Leaves”, taking a specific part of a song that, to my memory, was seldom if ever switched up, and reworking it on the spot, it all feels significant. Especially in light of the fact that the song would essentially run out of its evolutionary runway in another 24 hours. So for him to sing…

It looked like ten thousand

Women around my front porch

Didn’t know if I’d listen to ‘em

Or keep on lookin’ north

I’m just reminded of the fact that no song should ever be considered complete or finished or beyond reinterpretation. 

Acolytes of St. Francis of Assisi may be surprised to catch Jack’s in-the-moment name drop of Brother Sun, Sister Moon in the midst of an extended rant toward the end of “Do.” Though it may bear repeating that “Little Bird” and its “I wanna preach to birds” lyric is explicitly inspired by the 13th century saint, it should require no leap of faith to imagine the 1972 Franco Zeffirreli film depicting the life and times of Francis being viewed by Jack as a prepubescent altar boy. Eschewing his wealthy upbringing for a life of piety and monasticism, Francis would become patron saint of Italy, the first documented stigmatic and the creator of the first live nativity scene. If there’s a Catholic Hall of Fame, St. Francis of Assisi is definitely a first-ballot shoe-in.

Nuggets like Jack’s borderline goofy drunk introduction of Meg for “In The Cold, Cold Night” with “Miss Meg White takes center stage!” belies a truly stellar performance while brief, blink-and-you-missed-it riff inversions on both “Astro” and “Little Cream Soda” are delicious little surprises to revel in. And I’ll be damned if the organ-driven take on “I Want To Be The Boy To Warm Your Mother’s Heart” is a welcome reminder that every last live version of this song is worth listening to. It never fails disappoints, it always satisfies.

But the juiciest plum in this set is the unexpected, abrupt abandonment of “Seven Nation Army” a mere ninety seconds into the song. When Jack says “I don’t know if we should play this song in America anymore…I guess it doesn’t translate well…lost something in the translation” he says so without knowing it’d be the last time that he and Meg ever played the song together.

I remember this happening that night, but at the time I never mentioned it or thought to bring it up.

But 15 years later I had to. 

So in an email with the subject line “dumb white stripes question” I reached out to Jack for clarity on the situation. His response…

oh i think i was just joking because it had become such a soccer chant at the time and that europeans loved it “more” than americans for a minute there

and they weren’t singing any english lyrics just saying “po po po po” in Italy, so i was joking that americans didn’t understand the “foreign language” of “po po po po po po po”

That reads nicely. 

But I cannot help being reminded that in 2007 George W. Bush was still in office and folks were still wildly pissed about his mere existence AND the ongoing overseas US military boondoggles. That year would see a total of 904 American armed forces casualties in Iraq alone, the single highest yearly total in the entirety of said occupation.

So in Alabama, I dunno…a bunch of self-identifying, sweat-soaked rednecks chanting along…it had just the faintest twinge of jingoistic misappropriation originating from the crowd…that basso ostinato chopping along with the sinister Dorian mode overtone. It sounds ominous. “Army” is in the title. I mean, it’s not a stretch.

At the time I remember just having half the half-second thought along these confused political lines and then literally have not thought about it since. The only contemporaneous review I can find of the show, written by Andy Smith, attributes the scuttled “Seven Nation Army” as an effort to prevent “the righteous and violent rigor of the lyrics (to) be misinterpreted as condoning an unrighteous war.”

So even if we do take Jack at his word here (which I think we should), what he says his intention was, it’s worth noting that the perceived notion in the air that night, at least to some, was of an entirely different tone. These are the shortcomings of interpretation. They will never rectify themselves.

So for Jack to switch the opening “Ball and Biscuit” lyrics to be…

Yes I am the Third Man, woman

But I am also the seventh son

…to me it reads as almost stentorian “LET ME SPELL IT OUT FOR YOU”-level of painting a picture just perfectly clear in light of the supposed confusion or misinterpretation of anything earlier in the set. With gusto.

Yet the impromptu lyrics on “300 MPH Torrential Outpour Blues” are deadly…

There’s all kinds of emotions that a phone call ain’t gonna fix

You took me to the brink woman, took me everywhere I didn’t want to go but I went anyway        I never want you to question where I was headed, yes that’s where my head is nowadays

The complexity and grasp of human condition displayed in an off-the-top-of-the-head exclamation, deftly cramming all those syllables into precise meter and landing on the rhyming couplet, all while giving off the impression that the severity and pathos contained therein surely must’ve been labored over intensely for hours, days, weeks even…well, isn’t that just the way to knock us all over?

Ending with “Boll Weevil” just a short trip up I-65 from the actual boll weevil monument in Enterprise, Alabama, and some on-mic praise of Sartain is a perfect way to put that specific, local, “we know exactly where we are” stamp on the entire evening. When Jack implores the crowd to not go looking for any ghosts on the property after the show, you have half a mind to respect those wishes. 

We in the touring party would not respect those wishes. After the show, a bunch of us (including Meg, but not Jack) climbed the stairs, single-file, to a precarious perch overlooking the vast, murky stretches of the complex. From above the entirely insufficient artificial light dappled the tiniest spots and failed to make a dent in the existentially overpowering void. 

Even more dread-inducing was the spectre of a pitch-black decommissioned railroad tunnel. From entry to exit, the path we were led to couldn’t have been more than 200 yards at most. But I do not exaggerate when I say there was a complete absence of any outside illumination in this stretch. Pure, unadulterated emptiness. Cannot see your own hand in front of your face insanity. The shit that so many horror film plots are predicated on and has kept the night light business booming since the passing of the torch from candle to light bulb.

We got our hands on a single, meager flashlight, yet between the 8 of us (or so) that were on the endeavor…it felt wildy inadequate to the point of palpable, impending fear.

But there’s a funny little thing that happened within this little group of friends upon venturing into the ghastly, haunted space. We were all still buzzy from the after effects of such a stunning live concert in such unconventional environs. Simply put…we laughed our fucking asses off. Hysterically. The entire time. What took us maybe five minutes to traverse passed in seemingly five seconds. No one seemed like they could even be bothered with being scared. In the face of the uncertain, of the overwhelming chasm…one light and each other was all we needed to lead the way. To illuminate. To get us to the desired destination. 

In the end, we’re all just chasing ghosts, looking for something to get us through.

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Setlist
Dead Leaves and the Dirty Ground
I Think I Smell a Rat
Icky Thump
When I Hear My Name
Hotel Yorba
The Denial Twist
Death Letter
Do
I’m Slowly Turning Into You
In The Cold, Cold Night
I Want To Be The Boy To Warm Your Mother’s Heart
Seven Nation Army
Astro
Jack the Ripper
Encore Gap


Encore
Little Cream Soda
A Martyr For My Love For You
One More Cup of Coffee (Valley Below)
300 M.P.H. Torrential Outpour Blues
We’re Going To Be Friends
I Just Don’t Know What to Do With Myself
Ball and Biscuit / Cool Drink of Water Blues
Boll Weevil

Weekly Live Stash Vol. XIX, July 15, 2022

Every Friday at 5 pm ET, nugs.net founder Brad Serling hosts “The Weekly Live Stash” on nugs.net radio, SiriusXM channel 716. Tune in to hear his selections of the best new live music, and check out this week’s playlist below featuring soundboard recordings including Pearl Jam covering Pink Floyd, Metallica in Madrid, and more from summer 2022 festivals and tours.

  1. Chalk Dust Torture
    Greensky Bluegrass
    7/9/22 Snowshoe, WV
  2. Comfortably Numb
    Pearl Jam
    6/18/22 Landgraaf, NLD
  3. Street Fighting Man
    Pearl Jam
    6/18/22 Landgraaf, NLD
  4. Blues for Allah Space>Cumberland Blues
    Dead and Company
    7/10/22 Philadelphia, PA
  5. About To Rage
    Gov’t Mule
    7/11/22 Tuttlingen, DEU
  6. Hotel Yorba
    Jack White
    7/1/22 Amsterdam, NLD
  7. I Don’t Know What I Want
    Umphrey’s McGee
    7/9/22 Marshfield, MA
  8. Master Of Puppets
    Metallica
    7/6/22 Madrid, ESP

Weekly Live Stash Vol. XVIII, July 8, 2022

Every Friday at 5 pm ET, nugs.net founder Brad Serling hosts “The Weekly Live Stash” on nugs.net radio, SiriusXM channel 716. Tune in to hear his selections of the best new live music, and check out this week’s playlist below featuring soundboard recordings from Trey Anastasio’s Billy Strings sit-in and Peach Fest set, Jack White in Hammersmith, and more from summer 2022 festivals and tours.

  1. Oye Como Va
    Santana
    6/28/22 West Valley City, UT
  2. Death Don’t Have No Mercy
    Dead and Company
    7/1/22 Bethel, NY
  3. Gotta Jibboo
    Billy Strings (w/ Trey Anastasio)
    6/29/22 New York, NY
  4. Roll Like A River
    Trey Anastasio Band
    7/2/22  Peach Festival
  5. Hot Tea
    Goose
    6/30/22 Quincy, CA
  6. Burn Them
    Greensky Bluegrass (w/ Molly Tuttle on guitar and Bronwyn Keith-Heinz, fiddle)
    7/2/22 Quincy, CA
  7. Ball And Biscuit
    Jack White
    6/28/22 London, GB
  8. In Memory of Elizabeth Reed
    Kitchen Dwellers (w/ Daniel Donato)
    7/1/22 Scranton, PA

Weekly Live Stash Vol. XVII, July 1, 2022

Every Friday at 5 pm ET, nugs.net founder Brad Serling hosts “The Weekly Live Stash” on nugs.net radio, SiriusXM channel 716. Tune in to hear his selections of the best new live music, and check out this week’s playlist below featuring soundboard recordings from Trey Anastasio’s Goose sit-in, Panic at Red Rocks, Dead & Company at Wrigley Field, and more from summer 2022 festivals and tours.

Weekly Live Stash Vol. XIV, June 10, 2022

Listen to “The Weekly Live Stash” with nugs.net founder Brad Serling every Friday at 5 pm ET on nugs.net radio, SiriusXM 716.

  1. The Howling
    Phish
    6/4/22 Noblesville, IN
  2. Plane Crash
    moe.
    5/29/22 Chilicothe, IL
  3. Dead Leaves and the Dirty Ground
    Jack White
    5/31/22 Los Angeles, CA
  4. Time
    Greensky Bluegrass
    6/4/22 Caledonia, MI
  5. Breathe Reprise
    Greensky Bluegrass
    6/4/22 Caledonia, MI
  6. Timebomb
    BIG Something
    6/4/22 Oak Hill, WV
  7. W.M.A.
    Pearl Jam
    5/13/22 Oakland, CA
  8. Tumble
    Goose
    6/6/22 Essex Junction, VT
  9. Partyin’ Peeps
    Umphrey’s McGee
    6/5/22 St. Augustine, FL

Live Music Festivals This Summer You Should Not Miss

Welcome back to every live music lover’s favorite time of year: it’s summer festival season. It’s time to pack up the camping gear, load up the car with friends and family and heed the melodious call of live summer music.

The 2022 summer music festival season marks the triumphant return of many of the music festivals we all missed out on during the worst of the pandemic. There is nothing quite like the sense of community inherent in enjoying great live music as a collective. There are memories to be made, people to meet, and most importantly, great music to enjoy. The music, the sunshine, the food…it all adds up to a fantastic time. If you’re a music fan, there’s no better way to spend your time than at one of these unique summer music festivals in 2022.

For the Jamband Lover: The Peach Music Festival

The Peach Music Festival celebrates its tenth anniversary with a much-anticipated return from its two-year hiatus! This summer music festival is a good choice for the festival attendee who wants to enjoy a stellar line-up of the best improvisational guitar music. The Allman Brothers founded the Peach Music Festival in 2012. It features a heavy-hitting lineup, a camper-friendly atmosphere, and a fantastic community ambiance amongst festival-goers.

When and where: The Festival will be from June 30 through July 3 at the Montage Mountain Ski Resort in Scranton, PA.

Who’s Playing: Billy Strings, Trey Anastasio, The Black Crowes, Goose, Joe Russo’s Almost Dead, Pigeons Playing Ping Pong, Keller Williams, The Revivalists, Doom Flamingo, The Nth Power, Eggy, Consider The Source, Yam Yam, Maggie Rose, TAUK, Daniel Donato, and more.

Learn more about The Peach Music Festival.

For the Entire Family: Hog Farm Hideaway

Hog Farm Hideaway is making its long-awaited debut at the Black Oak Ranch during the 2022 summer music festival season. Festival-goers will enjoy an intimate setting for the summer festival and a beautiful backdrop of sprawling meadows and majestic oak woodlands. The Black Oak Ranch is home to Hog Farm, one of the oldest communes in the country. They have a long history of involvement in music festivals, most notable among them being Woodstock in 1969. Hog Farm Hideaway is named in their honor and is billed as a musical treat for the entire family.  The lineup is a fun mash-up of different styles of jam. The festival will feature an area for children, a healing sanctuary, an activist alley, and visual arts center. Hog Farm Hideaway is an excellent choice for festival-goers who are hoping to enjoy music and community in a family-friendly environment.

When and where: Hog Farm Hideaway will take place from June 10 through June 12 at the Iconic Black Oak Ranch in Laytonville, CA.

LIVESTREAM: Get single or three-night passes to watch The String Cheese Incident live at Hog Farm Hideaway.

Who’s playing: The String Cheese Incident, Pigeons Playing Ping Pong, Galactic, The Infamous String Dusters, Holly Bowling, and many more.

Learn more about Hog Farm Hideaway.

For The EDM Enthusiast: Electric Forest

If you’re looking to experience something transcendent, then look no further. Electric Forest is nothing short of a magical experience. The festival is nestled in the Sherwood Forest, a gorgeous wonderland of art installations and twinkling lights. This summer music festival is the first of its kind, as its lineup is a fantastical blend of jam bands and electronic dance music that will have anyone on their feet. Electric Forest is a delight to the senses from the moment you step on the festival grounds to the moment you leave. 

When and where: Electric Forest will light up the sky from June 23 to the 26 at the Double JJ Resort in Rothbury, MI.

Who’s playing: The Disco Biscuits, Disclosure, The String Cheese Incident, Lettuce, Lotus, Marco Benevento, Big Gigantic, Kitchen Dwellers, The Nth Power, Star Kitchen, and more.

Learn more about Electric Forest.

For the Food and Drink Fan: Bourbon and Beyond

Bourbon and Beyond is a four-day summer music festival that features an eclectic lineup of indie rock, soul, country and southern rock. This festival features an impressively inclusive lineup that highlights some of the most talented emerging artists in the world of soul, blues, country, and some of the biggest names in indie rock. It also showcases an impressive amount of food and beverage vendors offering the best libations that Kentucky has to offer. This festival is a great choice for attendees who are passionate about good food, great music, and excellent whiskey.

When and where: The Bourbon and Beyond festival will take place from September 15 through the 18 and will take place at the Highland Festival Grounds at The Kentucky Expo Center.

Who’s playing: Jack White, Pearl Jam, The Revivalists, Jason Isbell, Crowded House, and more!

Learn more about Bourbon and Beyond.

For the Natural Beauty Lover: High Sierra

If you’re looking to see your favorite artists while surrounded by the majesty of nature, then High Sierra is the festival for you. High Sierra is celebrating 30 years of music nestled in the beauty of the Sierra mountains during this year’s summer festival season. This festival features an eclectic lineup, optional VIP packages, daily costume themes, and a family area. High Sierra is a great place to experience the beauty of the surrounding mountainside while enjoying the beating pulse of great summer music. 

When and where: High Sierra will take place from June 30 through July 3 at the Plumas County Fairgrounds in East Quincy, CA. 

Who’s playing: JRAD, Greensky Bluegrass, The Disco Biscuits, Goose, Pigeons Playing Ping Pong, Railroad Earth, Lettuce, The California Honeydrops, Spafford, Twiddle, SunSquabi, The Nth Power, and more!

Learn more about High Sierra.

For the Banjo Strummer: Telluride Bluegrass Festival

This legendary bluegrass festival has a reputation for spotlighting only the best emerging artists in the bluegrass and indie-folk space. It has been a part of the summer festival season since 1974 and anticipates over ten thousand yearly visitors. Telluride Bluegrass Festival is a unique experience that celebrates music, comedy, and circus performances. It features an annual battle of the bands and songwriting competition, as well as a family-friendly atmosphere. Telluride Bluegrass Festival is the perfect summer music festival for the attendee that wants to hear great bluegrass in the majesty of the Colorado wilderness. 

When and where: Telluride Bluegrass Festival kicks off its 49th festival in Telluride, CO from June 16 through the 19. 

Who’s playing: Tenacious D, Tyler Childers, The Infamous String Dusters, The Turnpike Troubadours, Peter Rowan, Kitchen Dwellers, and more! 

Learn more about Telluride Bluegrass.

If you can’t make it to a festival this summer, nugs.net has you covered. Start a free trial to listen to live soundboard audio, watch full concert videos, and livestream exclusive shows.

Weekly Live Stash Vol. X, May 13, 2022

Listen to “The Weekly Live Stash” with nugs.net founder Brad Serling every Friday at 5 pm ET on nugs.net radio, SiriusXM 716.

  1. Rock
    Widespread Panic
    5/7/22 Wilmington, NC
  2. For Whom The Bell Tolls
    Metallica
    5/5/22 Porto Alegre, BR
  3. Icky Thump
    Jack White
    5/1/22 Nashville, TN
  4. Turn On Your Lovelight
    Voodoo Dead
    5/1/22 New Orleans, LA
  5. Bird Song
    Billy Strings with Bobby Weir
    5/7/22 Nashville, TN
  6. Rock Candy
    The Disco Biscuits
    5/8/22 New Orleans, LA
  7. Close Your Eyes
    The String Cheese Incident with Billy Strings
    5/3/22 New Orleans, LA

Weekly Live Stash Vol. IX, May 6, 2022

Listen to The Weekly Live Stash with nugs.net founder Brad Serling every Friday at 5 pm ET on nugs.net radio, SiriusXM 716.

  1. Can’t You Hear Me Knockin
    My Morning Jacket (w/ Trey Anastasio)
    4/27/22 Atlanta, GA
  2. Why Can’t You Be Nicer to Me?
    Jack White
    4/27/22 Atlanta, GA
  3. We’re Going To Be Friends
    Jack White
    4/27/22 Atlanta, GA
  4. So Ready
    Goose
    5/1/22 Memphis, TN
  5. Demons
    Greensky Bluegrass (w/ Sam Bush)
    4/29/22 Wilkesboro, NC
  6. Sitting In Limbo
    Billy Strings
    5/1/22 Saint Augustine, FL
  7. Divisions
    Umphrey’s McGee
    4/29/22 Atlanta, GA
  8. First Tube
    Oysterhead
    5/1/22 Atlanta, GA

Weekly Live Stash Vol. VIII, April 29, 2022

Listen to The Weekly Live Stash with nugs.net founder Brad Serling every Friday at 5 pm ET on nugs.net radio, SiriusXM 716.

  1. Jailhouse Rock
    Bobby Weir & Wolf Bros
    3/10/22 Memphis, TN
  2. Lend Me A Hand
    The String Cheese Incident
    4/22/22 Asheville, NC
  3. Black Clouds
    The String Cheese Incident
    4/21/22 Charlottesville, VA
  4. Hide And Seek
    Billy Strings
    4/23/22 Irving, TX
  5. Weasel
    Spafford
    4/23/22 New York, NY
  6. Lazaretto
    Jack White
    4/21/22 Brooklyn, NY
  7. Fear of the Dawn
    Jack White
    4/19/22 Washington, D.C.
  8. Fuego>What’s The Use?
    Phish
    4/22/22 New York, NY

Weekly Live Stash Vol. VII, April 22, 2022

Listen to The Weekly Live Stash with nugs.net founder Brad Serling every Friday at 5 pm ET on nugs.net radio, SiriusXM 716.

  1. Carini
    Phish
    4/20/22 New York, NY
  2. Time Loves a Hero
    Eggy
    4/9/22 Boston, MA
  3. Here Comes Your Man
    Pixies
    4/18/04 Edmonton, CAN
  4. Seven Nation Army
    Jack White
    4/17/22 Boston, MA
  5. Black Clouds
    Billy Strings
    4/16/22 San Diego, CA
  6. Can’t Stop Now
    Kitchen Dwellers
    4/15/22 Bend, OR
  7. Ain’t That Wrong
    Spafford
    4/14/22 Hartford, CT

nugs.net Expands Live Concert Recording Catalog with Top Artists

nugs.net is thrilled to announce exciting new additions to its catalog of live concert recordings.

Over the past two decades, pioneer live music streaming platform nugs.net has evolved into the leading source for official live concert recordings from the largest touring artists in the world. With an ever-expanding digital archive of more than 25,000 concerts and hundreds of on-demand videos of full shows from marquee acts like Metallica, Pearl Jam, The Rolling Stones, Dead & Company, and Phish, nugs.net provides music fans VIP access to their favorite concerts anytime, anywhere. Throughout April, nugs.net is adding an iconic, genre-spanning collection of new artists and live concert recordings to their massive, unrivaled streaming library, including an epic selection of new and archival shows from Jack White, DARKSIDE, Pixies and more. 

Jack White’s Supply Chain Issues Tour Concert Audio

On the heels of releasing his eagerly awaited new album, FEAR OF THE DAWN, Jack White kicked off his Supply Chain Issues Tour last week with two sold-out shows at Detroit’s Masonic Temple Theatre. The tour, which features White’s first headline shows in four years, will make 50+ stops across North America, Europe, and the United Kingdom through late August. In partnership with nugs.net, White will offer official soundboard audio from every stop on the tour, available to stream exclusively via nugs.net here: nugs.net/jackwhite. Of the new partnership, Third Man Records co-founder Ben Blackwell shares, “While we’ve been recording all Jack White live shows for years, only now did it finally feel right to release all of them quickly after the performance. And with nugs.net as our partner…we couldn’t be happier with the results.”

Six Epic Sets from Psychedelic Duo DARKSIDE

Beginning today, music fans around the globe can enjoy full-length concerts from DARKSIDE, the psychedelic collaboration between electronic producer Nicolas Jaar and guitarist Dave Harrington, who have partnered with nugs.net to bring two visually driven, atmospheric performances, as well as official soundboard audio from five epic concerts to the platform’s extensive streaming catalog for the first time. Watch DARKSIDE’s intimate sunset show overlooking the Manhattan skyline, Psychic Live set at Stereolux in Nantes, and more streaming exclusively on nugs.net here: nugs.net/DARKSIDE.

26 Pixies Archive Concert Recordings

Alt-rock icons Pixies also join nugs.net this month. 26 full-length concerts from the archives, including recordings from 1991 and the band’s 2004 reunion tour, will be available to stream on April 21 at nugs.net/thepixies. All shows feature the band’s original lineup: frontman Black Francis, guitarist Joey Santiago, bassist Kim Deal, and drummer David Lovering. Highlights include Pixies’ first show in 11 years at the intimate Fine Line in Minneapolis, a performance on the mainstage at Coachella, and a 2004 sold-out, four-night run at Brixton Academy in London. 

Immersive 360 Reality Audio

Throughout the month, nugs.net will continue to bring the live concert experience to music lovers worldwide. Stream iconic performances and classic albums by David Bowie, Pink Floyd, and Janis Joplin in immersive 360 Reality Audio, which brings the electricity of live music and the energy of a crowd to you like never before. Experience exclusive live recordings from the Bruce Springsteen Archives, like The Roxy ’75, as if you were in the room with the E Street Band on the Born to Run Tour. Listen to the classic Jefferson Airplane Volunteers album the way it sounded in the studio, and hear David Gilmour play “Wish You Were Here” with the Polish Baltic Philharmonic Orchestra like you’re in the crowd of 50,000 fans. For more information and to start listening visit: try.nugs.net/360.

Third Man Thursday: Jack White Live in Paris 2012

Jack White

LISTEN NOW: L’Olympia Bruno Coquatrix, Paris, France – July 2nd, 2012

By Ben Blackwell

With his trusty all-male backing band the Buzzards, Jack White’s July 2012 solo debut in Paris is chock full of reimagined White Stripes/Raconteurs/Dead Weather favorites sprinkled amongst gems from the just-released Blunderbuss. Throw in choice covers of songs originally by Hank Williams and Dick Dale and a guest appearance by show openers First Aid Kit on “We’re Going To Be Friends” and the end result is a 23-song performance that runs the gamut from blistering to brash to breaking hearts. 

Setlist
Black Math
Dead Leaves And The Dirty Ground
Missing Pieces
Weep Themselves To Sleep
Love Interruption
Tennessee Border
Hotel Yorba
Two Against One
I Cut Like A Buffalo
Trash Tongue Talker
Blunderbuss
Hypocritical Kiss
The Same Boy You’ve Always Known
Top Yourself

Encore
Nitro
Sixteen Saltines
Cannon
Blue Blood Blues
I Guess I Should Go To Sleep
We’re Going To Be Friends
Carolina Drama
Catch Hell Blues
Seven Nation Army

Jack White Live at Garden Bowl Lounge, 2001

Jack White

LISTEN NOW: Garden Bowl Lounge, Detriot, MI, June 3rd, 2001

By Ben Blackwell

The weekend had been a whirlwind…the slightly odd outdoor college gig on the Columbus campus of Ohio State at dusk on Friday night followed by the third time in nine months that the Stripes were onstage at Southgate House in Newport, Kentucky on Saturday evening…pretty sure it was the first run of gigs in the brand new 2001 model Dodge van that Jack and Meg had bought from the dealership for straight cash. I sold merch out of the back of the van in Columbus, Weezer’s “Green Album” was listened to on the drive, the band goofed on the Gories’ “Rat’s Nest” on Friday night…these are the few memories that are still retrievable two decades on.

We made our way back to Detroit with a tad bit of urgency, as there was an interview with Ralph Valdez on WDET radio on Sunday night followed by this performance at the Garden Bowl Lounge, booked under the name “John Gillis” with hopes of notifying some people while not tipping off ALL people.

In my memory, Brendan Benson was doing sound or at least some approximation of it. There may have even been a newly purchased PA for the occasion, but still, that room is a hard one to get the sound just right. Compared to previous Jack White performances in this spot, it felt a hair more subdued…no other musicians, no feral screaming, still that same electric hum, but more a calming exercise than some attempt to prove something or win folks over.

Jack first played the Garden Bowl Lounge, solo, in November 1998 and in the intervening three years he would play there no less than five additional times in various configurations. The June 3rd, 2001 show is, seemingly, the last time he’d play this intimate setting where he’d spent so much time, both socially and on stage, that time and the experience gained used to propel himself from local up-and-coming musician to internationally renowned ROCK STAR.

That being said, I am hard-pressed to find or recall ANY set by Jack White, in any incarnation or band, that is as varied and unique as this Garden Bowl gem. A layover, stopoff, way station…in my eyes, something that just had to be done as a means to get to the better things in the not-so-distant future. The metaphorical closing of one door so that fifty more could open.

All these years later, I’m legitimately surprised to find out that this evening is likely the first-ever live performance of “I’m Finding It Harder To Be A Gentleman.” The take here is charmed…almost as if Jack had never even tried to tackle it without the beating heart electric piano that pumps throughout the recorded version…having to find his footing on the fly but never tipping his hand to the struggle.

Coupled with an early live outing of “We’re Going To Be Friends” and solid runs through tried-and-true (at least in Detroit) songs “Hotel Yorba” and “The Same Boy You’ve Always Known” along with “You’ve Got Her In Your Pocket” a good two years before the band would record it and those are the only de facto White Stripes songs shared this evening. The majority of the set is a phalanx of covers which almost reads as a road map as to where the future would lead.

Like “Rated X”…the Loretta Lynn-penned polemic here is plain but pointed, the live from the Hotel Yorba version would be recorded within a week and end up as a b-side from the Stripes come November.

Or “Cold Brains”…on this evening all contemplative and compelling, while just over a year later and an hour up the road Jack would perform it live with its writer Beck at the Michigan Theater in Ann Arbor.

Or “Baby Blue”…the 1958 Gene Vincent rockabilly gem, which soon after this performance found its way into Stripes sets and in seven weeks time would wrap up, on a lark, their first ever session for John Peel, as earlier that evening Peel had mentioned his appreciation for Vincent in passing.

“Who’s To Say…”  had been a staple of Two Star Tabernacle’s sets during their brief 1997-1999 existence. The song was written by White’s Two Star bandmate Dan Miller and would see its debut release via Miller’s group Blanche on a 7-inch on my imprint Cass Records. Released “summer 2003” (I’m terrible with non-Stripes timelines) and complete with a stellar guest guitar solo from White, the Stripes’ version would follow close behind as the flipside to their “I Just Don’t Know What To Do With Myself” single in September 2003.

“Fragile Girl” was originally written by Dean Fertita and performed in his group the Waxwings, who joined the White Stripes on their West Coast tour in July 2001. Fertita would later perform with White in the Raconteurs and then as bandmates in the Dead Weather. White’s pre-song anecdote speaks to his endearing mishearing of the lyric “to unveil a vision” as “television” and its ability to break up a couple or bring them closer together.

The middle of the set is thick with blues and folk covers. White’s tackling of “Dying Crapshooter’s Blues” is arguably the highlight of the entire performance. The daft deathbed storytelling is accompanied by insistently accelerating guitar…from slow, to trot, to rollicking…as the listed litany of last requests piles up, the specter of impending death is palpable, as if there’s a rush to get all these thoughts out before Death wields its mighty scythe.

The folk standard “Black Jack Davey” tells its tale with an austerity of words, which would later make an appearance as the b-side to “Seven Nation Army” in roughly two years time.

“In My Time Of Dying” likely shows up on White’s radar via Zeppelin’s 1975 version. In the context of his performance here, both Blind Willie Johnson’s 1927 original (titled “Jesus Make Up My Dying Bed) and Dylan’s well-known take from 1962 seem to figure prominently.

White’s version barely hits the ninety second mark when, right before the start of the third verse, he pivots into Blind Willie McTell’s “Lord, Send Me An Angel.” Curiously, the first word of that third verse is “Lord” and I can’t help but think this was a purposeful connection between the two done on Jack’s part.

For me, being in the crowd for this performance was a treat…these were all songs that kinda felt like they’d just been floating in the ether for the past couple years. Things that’d be goofed on, messed with, maybe never fully explored yet. In the spirit of that, at approximately 3:14 mark of “The Same Boy You’ve Always Known” you can hear my distant voice yell “Hypnotize!” from the bar.

Jack had written the song roughly three years earlier as a “gift” to local band the Hentchmen. He’d come up with the idea that was vaguely in their musical wheelhouse, recorded a demo where he played all the instruments, and then shared it with them to ultimately…end up having the White Stripes do a version for “Elephant.”

Having heard that demo at the time and likely nothing of it in the intervening three years…I was just hoping to hear it again. My request went unanswered and I’d end up waiting another eight months or so before the Stripes started playing it live.

A recording of this show made by taper Brian Rozman seemed to be available in trading circles pretty quickly after the performance. The quality is solid. A few years back when gathering disparate master tapes for our vault, a DAT of this show recorded by Brendan Benson landed on my lap. Having been previously in the dark about its existence, I was happy to hear it was even better quality than the respectable audience tape…yet failed to capture the entirety of the performance.

So with the help of our crack mastering engineer Bill Skibbe, we stitched those two recordings together and gave the whole thing a proper mastering clean up for the audio you listen to today, just two weeks shy of its twentieth anniversary.

The Garden Bowl Lounge looks largely unchanged now from how it was back in 2001. There’s a new coat of paint on the walls, the random black and blue linoleum flooring has been replaced. But if you get in the cozy little nook where Jack was set-up on that calm Sunday night in 2001 and look up, you’ll see the same checker pattern black and white ceiling tiles, having held that spot for Lord knows how long.

Jack White’s preparatory setlist for the evening

Jack White’s transcription of “Dying Crapshooter’s Blues” lyrics

Jack White’s transcription of “Fragile Girl” lyrics

Metro Times review of the performance

ARE TEENAGE DREAMS SO HARD TO BEAT?

By Ben Blackwell, The White Stripes archivist and drummer for Jack White And The Bricks:

I was never legally old enough to enter the Gold Dollar when it was a functioning rock and roll club.

From my first visit on June 6th, 1998 (The White Stripes opening for Dura-Delinquent) until my final time through the front door on August 8th, 2001 (my band the Dirtbombs playing as a kick-off to a West Coast tour) I spanned the ages of 15 through 19. For insurance purposes, the bar was a 21-and-over establishment. But whether by carrying amps, playing the drums or just earnestly convincing whomever was working the door that I legitimately had no interest in consuming alcohol…I was able to see no less than two dozen shows there. 

As likely the youngest person to have been a witness/participant in the music scene at the Gold Dollar…I am well aware that I was DAMN lucky to have done so. That may be the coolest thing I am ever even remotely adjacent to and truly embracing it I feel simultaneous both proud and depressed. Most people who peak as teenagers do so as some sort of high school football/cheerleader/big shot on campus bullshit…all things that I was expressly avoiding at that time. Yet, here I am, over twenty years later, still talking about the group that had a half-dozen mildly attended performances within a nuclear blast radius of each other, across five months of 1999 like it’s goddamned “Glory Days” and I’m Bruce stepping back from the mic so that the crowd can shout along the words to the chorus.

Tony Soprano saying “Remember when is the lowest form of conversation” fucked me up more than any other dialog in my life. I feel like I am constantly fighting with myself. Fighting to appropriately appreciate and contextualize the past and at the same time, attempting to downplay it, hoping that I’m currently living something that will be worthwhile to recollect in another twenty years. 

While I weirdly never felt like “The Bricks” (a name we’d never called ourselves and were never referred to as when we were actually performing) were a real band, I was, by far, the weakest player in the group of otherwise professionals. I had yet to join the Dirtbombs and prior to my gigs with the Bricks I had played MAYBE three shows in front of a crowd. One of those was a high school battle of the bands. Another in a bowling alley lounge. You know…inconsequential shit.
So while an audience recording of this show existed in tape trading circles since immediately after the performance, this multi-track soundboard recording proved revelatory in what had been unheard to my ears since that night. The opening of “Dead Leaves and the Dirty Ground” shined through with Brendan Benson’s striking countermelodies on guitar, all but nonexistent on the audience tape. When the opening lyrics came through I was confused…” Why is Brendan singing?” The delivery is unmistakably him, though through years and years of listening on a lo-fi tape I’d never noticed Brendan sang the first two lines…

Dead leaves and the dirty ground when I know you’re not aroundShiny tops and soda pops when I hear your lips make a sound…

Only to have Jack jump in, with gusto, guts, glory, and the response to Brendan’s call..

When I hear your lips make a sound!

I’m not exaggerating here…when I first heard this, clear as daylight, I choked up a bit. I think it’s beautiful and feels like a truly moving moment just accidentally happened to be caught on tape that night.

Although I play drums here, I have few clear memories of what went down that evening. Royal Trux, the headliners, were late to arrive. I believe they showed up after we’d finished our set. My mom was there. It was a school night. I was seventeen years old. Pretty sure I got paid. That’s about it. My entire time in the band I was just making a very poor attempt to play drums like Patrick Keeler. Why I thought I could approximate his style is beyond me, and I often compare myself to Billy Yule playing drums in the last-gasp iteration of the Velvet Underground. I really shouldn’t have been on stage or in this band, but am forever grateful and happy that I was.

The setlist features a couple of songs that aren’t on the Bricks live recording from the Garden Bowl two months prior, which was released as part of Third Man’s Vault #15 in 2013. “One and Two” is an original Jack White song that never ended up being used or recorded anywhere else, which is odd for him. I particularly enjoy the slippery bass playing of Kevin Peyok on this song and feel like he may well have been the glue that held the band together. “Candy Cane Children” feels odd outside of the context of the White Stripes, especially as they never really performed the song live. “Ooh My Soul” is sloppy sloppy sloppy and in my opinion, the first two chords presage what would come later via “Fell in Love With a Girl.”

All my personal caveats aside, the show is a legitimately fun listen. That weird time in ’99 where Jack just seemed like he had so much music seeping out of him that he had to hurry up and start ANOTHER band after the break-up of Two Star Tabernacle and his ousting from the Go…and that band seeming to be COMPLETELY different from either of those outfits or the White Stripes even. I can’t help but stress here, besides “Candy Cane Children” NONE of these songs would’ve been considered “White Stripes” songs at the time of this performance. They were “Jack White” songs that hadn’t truly found their form or footing in the duo format. 

Originally included as part of our 27th Vault package back in the first quarter of 2016, the audio here is newly remastered by Bill Skibbe at Third Man Mastering…a facility only blocks away from the Gold Dollar address at 3129 Cass Avenue.

As part of my duties at Third Man Records, I was able to enter what remained of the Gold Dollar building on “official business” not long after the original release of this show. Clad in a hard hat and joined by folks representing the Illitch family that owned the spot…it was a sad collection of four walls, dirt floor, and collapsing ceiling. The idea was to try and see if there was some sort of collaboration that Third Man could spearhead to rehab the building. But damn…all I could think of was that besides the walls, there was no “there” there. As someone who had MANY formative nights in that space and saw more than my fair share of transformative performances on that stage AND could possibly help revitalize it…I was unmoved. I’d rather let the memories exist as they were than invoke a Ship of Theseus experiment. Though I did take solace in the fact that I had finally entered the building legally. 

On July 22nd, 2019, the structure would meet its ultimate demise in a suspected arson, the news of which no less than a dozen people felt compelled to immediately share with me. Developers reached out to me directly asking if Third Man would be interested in trying to rebuild/recreate the spot. Dare I even mention that there was talk of Third Man getting the building for a $1/year lease prior to the fire? And that we weren’t interested then?
When asked by the Metro Times to comment on the fire at the time I said, “History like what happened at that club, for me, transcends the buildings it happened in. I’m sure there were probably at least five other fires in Detroit today that were far more tragic. Life goes on. This too shall pass. Memories are all that matter.”

I stand by that statement. I think I was unemotional about the fire because I actually had the vague “closure” of being able to walk through that room one last time. Bar missing, mirrors behind the stage disintegrated, finally able to go backstage for the first time (no one ever told me there was a backstage!)…the only sign music ever happened there being a destroyed Half Japanese / Godzuki / Wild Bunch handbill I’d dug out from underneath where the security monitors were. Otherwise…it was just a space, empty for 15 years, left to the ravages of time and the elements and scrappers and squatters and in desperate need of being demolished. You know…a regular building in Detroit.

So here’s to the memory of the Gold Dollar, to club owner Neil Yee for being wise enough to hit “record” so many times, to the sublime summer of ’99, to peaking early, to electric nights of loose rock and roll, played for no one you didn’t know, figuring it all out in the process, working on mysteries without any clues, crystalline and idealized in my mind, me unaware of how clueless I actually was at the time, feeling like there was nothing but opportunity, potential and promise that lay ahead. 

While youth may be wasted on the young, why are teenage dreams so hard to beat? I think memories, true, deep, stay-with-you-the-rest-of-your-life-because-they’re-fundamental-to-your-ever-so-fragile-sentience MEMORIES are only thrust onto those who are both sufficiently eager and receiving. Old guys who only talk about old times have closed off their receptors, failing to continue as memory collectors. Scientists say that humans aren’t the only beings that recollect, that rats can have episodic memory, but I doubt those vermin are ever troubled by it. Yet the tenuous balance between nostalgia and living in the moment shows no signs of subsiding in my consistently evolving superego…with all indications that my final actions, final words, and final thoughts on this mortal coil will almost certainly be some act of reminiscing.
I hope when I get older I don’t sit around thinking about it, but I probably will.
You know…glory days.

-Ben Blackwell

February 17th 2021